All posts by WasteWater Education

This site has been created by WasteWaterEducation.org a 501(c)3 not for profit. This is a resource site for anyone interested in learning more about how to use and maximize use of conventional, advanced and community integrated wastewater systems

It’s ALL about the money isn’t it?

Model. Monitor. Map. Maintain. Manage.
Tools for crunching numbers: For communities of any size.

This 8 week Symposium is an opportunity to learn from the best how to make wise, affordable and sustainable wastewater decisions for your community.
All events can be attended live or viewed later as an on-demand recording.

To view the individual sessions or register for all 8 go to

https://wastewatereducation.org/symposium.html

Session One: Watershed Modeling Tools is now available here.

Optimizing anaerobic digesters – an australian perspective

Feedstock mixture design in anaerobic co-digestion to maximise resource recovery potential

Mike Meng is currently working as resource recovery engineer at Queensland Urban Utilities in Australia leading multiple resource recovery initiatives and R&D projects . Mike has obtained a chemical engineering PhD on anaerobic co-digestion from the University of Queensland and has strong interest in applying expertise to water industry applications for achieving circular economy outcomes.

Mike enjoys wastewater and waste education through knowledge sharing, evident by 5 years of teaching for undergraduate courses “Industrial Wastewater & Solid Waste Management” and “Process Control and Synthesis” at the University of Queensland. An immediate past member on the Australian Water Association Young Water Professional Committee, Mike is passionate about driving a positive change in the committee through participation in mentoring and leading student engagement activities. Mike’s goal is to keep developing engineering expertise and leadership in water and organic waste management and assist Water Utilities in transitioning to full spectrum of resource recovery implementation.

Anaerobic co-digestion (AcoD) is an established technology typically applied to water and agricultural industries to redirect organic wastes away from landfill for beneficial reuse. In AcoD, designing co-digestion mixtures to ensure optimal digester performance and effectively manage co-digestion products is important. In the presentation, Mike will share his PhD research outcomes and practical experience around co-digestion mixture design and operation at one of Australia’s largest sewage treatment plants (STPs).
 
 Currently, in the Australian water industry, there is emerging and strong interest in co-digestion at sewage treatment plants (STPs), which redirects commercial trade wastes away from the landfill for beneficial reuse. AcoD is a biochemical engineering approach that simultaneously treats two or more waste streams in a centralized digestion facility for enhanced energy recovery and enables circular economy outcomes.
 
Designing co-digestion mixtures for optimised digester performance was a knowledge gap in research as well as in practical application. This means selecting compatible feedstocks at the right volumes with optimal feeding strategies for digesters needs to be understood and incorporated into specific digester operating scenarios.
 
Co-digestion of complex solid wastes such as fat, oil, grease and food waste with sewage sludge is a step change for many water utilities in Australia and hence requires a series of technical and organizational barriers to be overcome. Developing in-depth understanding of the co-digestion process, its associated downstream impacts, and meeting additional infrastructure requirements for co-digestion are important. In particular, organic waste characterization, co-digestion mixture design, and co-digestion product management are some key areas many water utilities’ waste-to-resources initiatives are currently focusing on. As part of the presentation, Mike will also give an overview of some of the resource recovery initiatives Queensland Urban Utilities are undertaking and how he is using research findings to assist the organisation in the resource recovery space.

You can watch a recording of this event here:

We have been busy – and we have a new office

WasteWater Education 501(c)3 came to the close of our FY2019-20 with a healthy balance and increased participation – in both distance learning online/on demand CEU classes and WWETT sponsored public education events! Look for the publication of our Annual Report here shortly.

It is with a heavy heart we acknowledge the demand for our distance learning expertise has come at a sad cost and for the saddest of reasons – Covid19. We are honored to help but wish it wasn’t for this reason.

Since the June WWETT event discussing the innovation happening in Swedish wastewater reuse, we have hosted the following events which you can also view on our YouTube Channel.

Watch the Recording HERE Irrigation of Agricultural crops with Recycled Water. Regulations that Protect the Public Health
BAHMAN SHEIKH, PhD, PE.Visiting Assistant Professor, University of California, Davis
It is with great sadness that we report that Bahman passed away peacefully shortly after recording this event. Our thoughts are with his family.
This event focuses on the experience gained in the field in California and other regions over the past several decades regarding use of recycled water for irrigation of agricultural crops.
Regulations governing use of recycled water for agriculture will be discussed comparing their stringency and effectiveness with special emphasis on microbial risks.
Chemical risks from use of recycled water for irrigation will also be discussed summarizing research findings of recent years, particularly with regard to constituents of emerging concerns, also called microconstituents.
The main conclusion to be drawn is that existing regulations are adequately protective of the health and safety of farm workers and consumers of agricultural crops grown with recycled water. The extremely low concentrations of microconstituents detected in recycled water are placed in perspective with calculated numbers of years of exposure necessary to accrue one safe daily dose of each of the constituents of concern.
Presented by Ben Kele, Arris Water, and WasteWater Education 501(c)3. See: https://www.arris.com.au/water/
Watch The Recording HERE Flying In[formation] : Compatible asset management done right!

Michael Thompson, Vice President T4 Spatial

What kept you awake at night a year ago has now changed – for ever.

Communities of any size, from 250 to 250K, are facing the new reality of reduced revenue, ongoing repair costs, and wildly fluctuating use patterns.
If you have an asset management system, or are wondering if now might be the time to figure out how this might work for you, come see how Los Angeles County does this in real time.
In any community, there are many employees, departments, contractors, inspectors and service personnel who all need to work together and have equal access to any piece of the data that impacts them – on demand.
Asset management is not just a data base, not just a catalog of parts and activities. At its best it mirrors the system and allows everyone, at any time, to see what’s happening – and what might be ABOUT to happen!
Hosted by t4Spatial, where the mission is simple. To get more value from your pipeline inspection data and CCTV video. That means storing, indexing, and sharing your videos in the cloud and visualizing your inspection data via embedded links so it’s more accessible, usable, and valuable. Can you to find the information you need, when you need it, and from any device, while tethering your resources together to maximize workflows?

Come find out how.
Watch the recording HERE How to avoid drowning in data: mobile friendly environmental data management systems.

Russell Schindler CEO, Founder SampleServ
Environmental decisions are based on environmental sampling data. But how much is toomuch?!
Having the ability to quickly and clearly understand the data is important to quality decision-making.
Using web and mobile platforms facilitates the management, collection, labeling, and reporting of both environmental field data and laboratory data. SampleServe facilitates planning, sampling and the reporting for a wide range of environmental professionals and service personnel.
Come find out how.

WasteWater Education recently renewed the 2 year contract for our long serving Executive Director Dendra Best. Our official mailing address and company contact is still in Michigan but Dendra has now relocated to just outside Hilo, HI.

We continue to serve a global client base.

WWETT Sponsored two new webcasts in June 2020

Innovation in potable reuse in Sweden. REGISTER HERE
From 2014 to 2019 Peter Asteberg was the project manager for the planning, design and construction of three new drinking water plants on Öland, a Swedish island in the Baltic Sea with extensive water shortage. In 2016 he was assigned to manage the development of a combined desalination and water reuse plant in Mörbylånga on the southeast coast of Öland. The Mörbylånga Drinking Water Plant, which was partly commissioned in 2019, is the first full-scale facility ever in Sweden for direct potable reuse of water. Therefore, the plant has received both national and international attention.
Co-Presenter is Tommy Lindström, BSc Construction Engineering and Energy. As a former island energy strategist, he has collaborated with islands across Europe and have great knowledge and experience on the island perspective. After being the regional energy coordinator for the county administrative board he is now back in international projects as project manager for the regional energy agency for southeast of Sweden. Working with resilience, sustainable tourism, renewable energy, energy efficiency and smart transports. As a volunteer he supports the Swedish Eco-municipality Association with international collaboration with South America and is also the Energy and Waste management coordinator at Engineers without borders- Sweden.

Irrigation of Agricultural crops with Recycled Water: Regulations that Protect the Public Health – REGISTER HERE

Bahman Sheikh has over 30 years of domestic and international experience in research, planning, and design of water resources projects, specializing in water conservation, reclamation, reuse, and recycling. Dr. Sheikh’s career began as a university professor. His academic career was followed by consulting, technical investigations, master planning, and design of water resources facilities. Sheikh’s water recycling experience includes service in both the public and private sectors. For the City of Los Angeles, he developed long-term water reuse goals, planned water recycling projects to the year 2090, and advanced public outreach.

This webinar focuses on the experience gained in the field in California and other regions over the past several decades regarding use of recycled water for irrigation of agricultural crops. Regulations governing use of recycled water for agriculture will be discussed comparing their stringency and effectiveness with special emphasis on microbial risks. Chemical risks from use of recycled water for irrigation will also be discussed summarizing research findings of recent years, particularly with regard to constituents of emerging concerns, also called microconstituents.

The main conclusion of the webinar is that existing regulations are adequately protective of the health and safety of farm workers and consumers of agricultural crops grown with recycled water. The extremely low concentrations of microconstituents detected in recycled water are placed in perspective with calculated numbers of years of exposure necessary to accrue one safe daily dose of each of the constituents of concern.

The main audience for this presentation includes professional engineers, utility managers, farm managers, irrigation experts, and others interested in the safety of agricultural products grown with recycled water irrigation.