Category Archives: Environmental Health

#GivingTuesday, Wednesday, Thursday……. etc.

Today please reach out to your contacts and social media to help us promote
We make a living by what we earn.
We make a life by what we give to others.
Help us to pay forward to ensure water stays water – not waste!

Does The Risk Of Legionnaire’s Disease Rise When There’s Lead In Your Water?

Article | June 16, 2016 From Water Online:

Ongoing monitoring shows that lead levels in Flint, Michigan’s water are dropping and getting closer to meeting federal safety standards. That’s some much-needed positive news for the community. But there’s still work to be done.

Sign On Letter to fund Flint

The deadline to sign on is Wednesday, August 17.

Please see the note below from HOW Coalition co-chair Mike Shriberg, Great Lakes Regional Executive Director with the National Wildlife Federation:

On behalf of the National Wildlife Federation and as one of the co-chairs of HOW, I want to strongly urge your organizations to sign on to the letter linked below urging Congress to (finally) provide federal aid to Flint.  This letter was crafted by both local community groups in Flint and through a national coalition that NWF is helping to lead (and includes HOW partners like American Rivers and Sierra Club).  We’re planning to send this up to the Hill when Congress returns from recess in September, with sign-ons requested by Wednesday, August 17.

Click here: https://goo.gl/forms/iir2kI5BsNw2rymB2

The letter highlights the Senate Water Resources and Development Act as the most viable legislative proposal currently pending to respond to the environmental and public health disaster. This links it closely to HOW’s work and is one concrete way that our organizations can engage in this critical issue – something that I know we all want to do but often are lacking the contacts, context and venues to do effectively.  Again, here’s the link to see the letter and sign-on:https://goo.gl/forms/iir2kI5BsNw2rymB2.  Feel free to forward widely. Please let me know if you have any questions or comments.

–          Mike

The deadline to sign on is Wednesday, August 17.

Celia Haven
Program Coordinator
Great Lakes Restoration
National Wildlife Federation
Great Lakes Regional Center
213 West Liberty, Suite 200
Ann Arbor, MI, 48104
havenc@nwf.org

Office: 734-887-7123
Cell: 734-347-3861

 

Mitigating the occurrence of harmful algal blooms

See https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDANIFA/bulletins/1577c06

Lake Eerie algae bloom

As temperatures rise this summer, people turn to local beaches and lakes as a fun way to cool off. However, recent toxic algal blooms have hindered this experience for some in places likeFlorida, California, New York, and Vermont.

Private Drinking Water Wells: Private wells offer safe and tasty water for millions of people, but they should be tested regularly.

Ensuring private water wells are safe and tasty… on this CurrentCast.

Approximately 43 million people in the U.S. get their water from private wells. And while most are safe, they should all be tested annually.

Cliff Treyens is with the National Groundwater Association.

Treyens: “Either man-made or naturally-occurring contamination can be a problem. For instance, arsenic and radon occur in the geology in many areas of the country and if it’s above a certain threshold, it could present a health risk.”

Household, agricultural, or industrial contaminants can also filter into the earth and end up in drinking water.

Working with a certified water specialist to test, treat and maintain a well will make sure the water is safe.

CurrentCast is produced in partnership with Cornell’s Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future. Learn more online at CurrentCast.org.

World Environmental Health Day – 6 session seminar September 26, 2014

wehday

Every Body Deserves A Decent Throne:
Crossing the Sanitation Divide – Past, Present and Future.

Six session seminar series provided at no charge through Google Hangouts On Air.

Session 1. 10- 10.45 am ET
https://plus.google.com/events/c5a8pagbtudisb61rk20uf4523k

Dendra Best will look at the history of sanitation in the US and how that has shaped the technology of infrastructure ever since.

Session 2. 11 – 11.45 am ET https://plus.google.com/events/c2j07kdvnstis05ijsmkidjhip0

Patrick Lucey – why traditional infrastructure is now unsustainable. His bio can be found at the aqua-tex.ca web site.
See: http://aqua-tex.ca/index.php?id=2&press=1&draw_column=1:1:2

Session 3. 11.50 am ET – 12.40 pm ET
https://plus.google.com/events/cbp6bl8rf77e3kmgbufender4ak

Patrick Lucey – successful case studies of sustainable integrated water systems from Canada and the US.

Break for Lunch

Session 4. 1.30 – 2.30 pm ET
https://plus.google.com/events/cpb2ea4j9o2cqn3500jirsqukso

The reality of Sierra Leone and Guinea – Derek Reinhard and the work of DeeperMissions.org

The theme for Environmental Health Day 2014 is inequality of access. Not only does DeeperMissions work in one of the poorest regions in west Africa, it now has to deal with the massive Ebola epidemic

Session 5. 2.40pm ET – 3.20pm ET
https://plus.google.com/events/c1s6h0ajh5obbe4kgsom5oq70i8

Patrick Lucey. A better future: how to export 21st. century knowledge not 19th century thinking.

If the problem is massive, is this the time to rethink how we provide basic sanitation and clean drinking water systems both here in the West and in developing countries? The environmental, weather and financial climate is a whole new ball game from when most of these technologies were the norm. What kind of legacy are we creating for our children or grandchildren if we keep on doing the same thing?

Session 6. 3.45pm ET – 4.30pm ET
https://plus.google.com/events/c9al5e9p3j3n5mmabovd78diksg

CollaborativeWaterSolutions.com Team – relevance to both small rural communities in CA and the US as well as Haiti, Africa and S. America.

Culture, demographics, access to support structures and expertise – all play a vital role in ensuring whatever is proposed as the ‘ideal’ solution will actually be feasible AND workable in the long run. So often planning is something that is done TO a community not WITH it.

Collaborative Water Solutions was created to build on the stellar work done by Water Environment Research Foundation where a team developed the Small Community Decision Making Tool to help local leaders determine their own best options for wastewater service.