Category Archives: Integrated Water Resources

Don’t Waste that Wastewater | The Johnson Foundation at Wingspread

Don\’t Waste that Wastewater | The Johnson Foundation at Wingspread.

via Don’t Waste that Wastewater | The Johnson Foundation at Wingspread.

One important study found that nearly 50 percent of existing coal-fired power plants have sufficient reclaimed water available within a 10-mile radius, and 75 percent have sufficient reclaimed water available within a 25-mile radius. DOE also concludes that we can significantly reduce the water dependency of power plants by switching to dry and wet-dry hybrid cooling technologies and by using alternative water sources instead of freshwater. This is powerful evidence of the enormous potential for energy companies and water utilities to work together to reduce the environmental impacts from – and the water-related vulnerabilities to – power plants.

In short, it’s time to stop wasting our wastewater and instead use it to protect our nation’s energy supply.”

“Speaking Up About Water” Blog www.speakingupaboutwater.com

Smart irrigation Donna Vincent Roa

Donna Vincent Roa and guest bloggers share insights on and analysis of headlines and news about water, with a particular emphasis on water communication, global water leaders, innovations, water research, water technologies and the value of water. http://www.speakingupaboutwater.com

October 22: Industries around the world are seeking new ways to make every drop of water count. Agriculture, which uses a high 70% of the world’s fresh water, is no different.

Many factors threaten the future of farming (e.g., saline soils, shallow water tables, inefficient irrigation and poor drainage). To survive, the industry needs smart irrigation technologies that can save water, deliver it more efficiently, and realize significant monetary savings.

The stark fact is that all of the food we eat requires water, in the right amount and at the right times. Agriculture is the industry with the biggest stakes and the biggest potential pay-off. It’s a market opportunity set for explosure growth.

The dynamic investment landscape includes government agencies interested in stimulating innovation that addresses efficient water resource management. The US Agency for International Development and the Swedish government, for example, recently announced a $25 million grant program to increase access to clean water for farming.

New perspectives, technologies and investments are needed. The smart irrigation technology market has the greatest potential for growth and addresses the biggest issue we face…food insecurity. The winners of the race will go to the farmers who apply the technology, the small, niche companies with breakthrough technologies and the investors who back them.

Onsite Insight : U.S. Water Alliance

Onsite Insight : U.S. Water Alliance.

via Onsite Insight : U.S. Water Alliance.

septic 5

Onsite Insight

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

New Urban Algae System Generates Energy While Cleaning Wastewater in Paris | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

via New Urban Algae System Generates Energy While Cleaning Wastewater in Paris | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building.

New Urban Algae System Generates Energy While Cleaning Wastewater in Paris by Taz Loomans, 12/05/12
filed under: clean tech, News, Renewable Energy, Sustainable Building, Water Issues
 ennesys, originoil, algae harvesting, algae fuel, biofuel, cleaning wastewater,Rendering from Axel Schoenert Architecture

Ennesys, a Paris-based energy systems company and OriginOil,
an American algae harvesting company just unveiled their new urban
algae demonstration project in La Defense, near Paris. The revolutionary
system harvests energy from algae present in wastewater while filtering
the wastewater for use as graywater.

Read more: New
Urban Algae System Generates Energy While Cleaning Wastewater in Paris |
Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green
Building

via New Urban Algae System Generates Energy While Cleaning Wastewater in Paris | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building.

“Roddenberry Foundation Gives $5 Million to J. Craig Venter Institute for Sustainable Wastewater Treatment Technology Development.”

Source:http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/news/story.jhtml?id=428900007
J. Craig Venter Institute Press Release 7/10/13.

The J. Craig Venter Institute, a nonprofit genomic research organization in La Jolla, California, has announced a $5 million grant from the Roddenberry Foundation for the development of wastewater treatment technologies.

The grant will be used to fund the development of JCVI scientist Orianna Bretschger’s BioElectrochemical Sanitation Technology (BEST), which uses microbial fuel cells (MFC) to treat wastewater and improve sanitation and water accessibility in the developing world. As the microbes in MFCs break down the organic matter in sewage and other types of wastewater, they produce electrons. The rapid movement of electrons across a fuel cell circuit generates electricity while accelerating the breakdown of the organic matter, resulting in fewer treatment byproducts such as sludge. The efforts of Bretschger’s team already have led to the successful treatment of municipal wastewater and sewage sludge at a 100-gallon per-day scale, the amount of wastewater produced by a small household on a daily basis.

“Dr. Bretschger’s MFC sustainable wastewater treatment project is exactly the type of innovative, field-changing research that fits our mission,” said Eugene “Rod” Roddenberry, president of the Roddenberry Foundation and son of Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry. “Her use of microbes to convert human waste into clean water and electricity is another step toward making disease a thing of the past. Her work also moves us closer to a future where all humankind’s most basics needs are not just met but abundantly supplied. In the world of Star Trek, technology offers a catalyst to the natural world in making amazing things possible.”

Veolia Water to build wastewater plant based on Organica system in France – Water Technology

Veolia Water to build wastewater plant based on Organica system in France – Water Technology.

Veolia Water

France-based water company Veolia Water’s subsidiary MSE has won a contract from the Vienne Water and Wastewater Authority (SIVEER) to construct a wastewater facility based on its Organica system.

The plant will be built in Les Trois-Moutiers commune, in the Poitou-Charentes region in western France, to treat wastewater from Les Trois Moutiers and Vienne Center Parcs holiday village.

The wastewater facility has been designed with a capacity for 8,000 people, of which 6,500 is for Center Parcs.

The Organica system blends conventional wastewater treatment technology with an ecosystem.

As part of the technology, the roots of plants are grown under a glasshouse and running up to depths of 1.5m into the effluent to promote the growth of bacteria and living organisms to treat the effluent.

The facility will treat contamination in wastewater, while consuming less energy compared to a conventional wastewater plant.

 

Ecologix Environmental Systems | Blog » Blog Archive » Fortune Features Ecologix for Role in Solving Fracking’s Biggest Problem

Ecologix Environmental Systems | Blog » Blog Archive » Fortune Features Ecologix for Role in Solving Fracking’s Biggest Problem.

What to Plant | WaterSense | US EPA

What to Plant | WaterSense | US EPA.

The United States has many different climate zones and topographic and geographic features. Each state and even areas within states differ in their ability to support different plant species without the need for supplemental water and fertilizers. The following plant lists will help you identify plants appropriate for your location. When designing your landscape for water-efficiency, be sure to choose plants that are defined as low water use or drought tolerant for your area. These plant species will be able to survive in your climate with minimal, if any, need for supplemental watering. See these simple tips for water-efficient landscaping for more ideas on lowering water use in your yard.